Top Books of 2019

In an effort to better keep track of my reading, I thought Id make a list of all the books Ive loved in 2019 thus far and then update it or write a follow up post at the end of the year. The books range from LGBT romance to nonfiction to fantasy/sci-fi.

The Lessons by Naomi Alderman – 5/5 – LGBT, Fiction

‘A man made of smoke.’

Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster by Adam Higginbotham – 5/5 – Nonfiction

‘If we survive until the morning, we’ll live forever.’

The Fever King (Feverwake #1) by Victoria Lee – 5/5 – LGBT, Fantasy, Dystopian

‘He didn’t plan anything. There was nothing to plan – he didn’t have contingencies, no connections in clandestine places who knew how to make a man disappear. All he had was impulse and the flash-fire certainty that yes, yes, this was the right thing to do.’

The City Always Wins by Omar Robert Hamilton – 5/5 – Nonfiction

‘We are surrounded by the conversations we didn’t have.’

Spellbook of the Lost and Found by Moïra Fowley-Doyle – 5/5 – LGBT, Magical Realism

‘Maybe it’s more about firsts. Maybe every first is a loss.’

If We Could Go Back (Camassia Cove #6) by Cara Dee – 4/5 – LGBT

‘Everything was black-and-white until you grew up and saw gray everywhere. There were millions of rights and wrongs in our lives, and blame could be placed with all of us.’

One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America by Kevin M. Kruse – 5/5 – Nonfiction

‘In 1954, Congress followed Eisenhower’s lead, adding the phrase “under God” to the previously secular Pledge of Allegiance. A similar phrase, “In God We Trust,” was added to a postage stamp for the first time in 1954 and then to paper money the next year; in 1956, it became the nation’s first official motto. During the Eisenhower era Americans were told, time and time again, that the nation not only should be a Christian nation but also that it had always been one. They soon came to believe that the United States of America was “one nation under God.” And they’ve believed it ever since.’

The Monsters We Deserve by Marcus Sedgwick – 5/5 – Gothic Fantasy

‘Yet every writer worth a good-god damn knows this too, for it is graven into each of us: no one cares for beauty. Not in fiction. Not on its own, not pure, untroubled beauty; not in fiction. It’s what we crave in the real world, of course; beauty, and you know I mean that in its broadest sense: the sense of kindness and wisdom and peace and joy: all the things in the world that are beautiful, and all the things we crave in real life, but which are not sufficient to count, on their own, for anything in the world of stories.’

Notes on Nationalism by George Orwell – 5/5 – Political Essays

‘The point is that as soon as fear, hatred, jealousy and power worship are involved, the sense of reality becomes unhinged. And, as I have pointed out already, the sense of right and wrong becomes unhinged also.’

to be updated …

A Map for The Outlands Pentalogy

My immensely talented friend Jenna-Claire Ellis created a map of the Kingdom of Cutta from The Outlands Pentalogy, and is kindly letting me share it with everyone! I’m honestly so blown away by how beautiful it is!

map

Map of Cutta ©Jenna-Claire Ellis

Book links: A Touch of Death (dystopian sci-fi, action/adventure, romance) | A History of Madness (dystopian sci-fi, action/adventure, romance) | A Promise of Return (dystopian sci-fi, action/adventure, LGBT romance) | A Dance of Lies (dystopian sci-fi, action/adventure, romance) | A Time of Prophecy (dystopian sci-fi, action/adventure, LGBT romance).