Reviews & Interviews Roundup

Book Review: Dim Stars (2020)
Book Review: The 13th Zodiac (2021)
Children’s Book Review: Annabelle & Aiden (2016)
Children’s Book Review: Lola: The Bracelet of Courage (2021)
Children’s Book Review: Jack the Unicorn (2021)
Children’s Book Review: The Adventures of Addy: The Tale of the Prince and the Dragon (2021)
Children’s Book Review: How to Hug a Cloud (2021)
Children’s Book Review: Bats at the Library (2008)
Author Interview: Eva Seyler
Author Interview: Amy Campbell
Author Interview: L.A. Wasielewski
Author Interview: Pedro Gabriel
Author Interview: L.L. Stephens
Author Interview: A. K. Ritchie
Author Interview: Amy Maltman
Author Interview: Luther Kross
Author Interview: Sinnamon Carnelian
Author Interview: Ciarán West
Author Interview: Mansur Hasib
Author Interview: Val Neil
Author Interview: Alan Denham
Author Interview: Barbara Avon
Author Interview: Rita A. Rubin
Author Interview: Maxime Jaz
Author Interview: Chris Clancy
Author Interview: Elford Alley
Author Interview: Dan McKeon
Author Interview: Elena Nix
Author Interview: Charlotte Sullivan Wild
Author Interview: M. W. McLeod
Author Interview: L. Krauch
Author Interview: Sarah Bell
Author Interview: D.N. Schmidt
Author Interview: Casie Aufenthie
Author Interview: Courtney Maguire
Author Interview: Diana L. Smith
Author Interview: Jamie Jackson

Review Roundup

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CHILDREN’S BOOK REVIEWS
The Wish Tree by Kyo Maclear
My Triceratops Won’t Wash by Elwyn Tate
Love Is by Diane Adams
An Egg Is Quiet by Dianna Hutts Aston
A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel
Mermaids on Mars by Nancy Guettier

You Might Feel This by William Thomas Brumley | poetry review
The words to say cannot be found
They have been locked away

I was so excited to get my hands on this collection of poetry that I devoured it in one sitting! Hard to pick a favourite poem honestly!

For those who like poetry, or share a love of Emily Dickinson, definitely give this one a go!

Punderworld by Linda Šejić | ✬comic review✬
‘She has … flowers in her hair.’

Hades and Persephone are so differently done in this than I’ve ever seen them done before, but oh my gosh this is just such a wholesome, lovely, feel-good comic and it constantly left me smiling like a foolish idiot. ♥︎_♥︎

More of this please!

AUTHOR INTERVIEWS
Author Interview: A. K. Ritchie
Author Interview: Amy Maltman
Author Interview: Luther Kross

ICYMI: 2021 in Review: Indie Books, Author Interviews & More!

Book Review Roundup

The Tap-Dancing Pigeon of Covent Garden by Serena Hassan

Oh my goodness, this book is just the cutest. A pigeon, just out of the nest, learns what life is like in the big city and discovers that his passion and joy rests with dancing and song. This book is filled with gorgeous art and fun prose, definitely worth a read!

The Gift Of Life II: Darkness Follows by Sean Stevens

As I embark,
upon this lesson,
left or right,
adverse progression

POETRY IS JUST FREAKING GROOVY OKAY?

It would be really hard to pick out my favourite poems from this collection because there were numerous ones that just impacted me, yanno? But I pulled out some of the quotes that really hit me.

Had we known
What time was left
Would our values still be pride?

And,

A writer for history
For whom I’ve become,
Eternal battles: What’s living?
To those who have none

There’s some truly fantastic writing in here, along with some lovely photography! Sean Stevens is definitely a poet worth checking out! I can’t wait to read more of his poems.

Thank you to the author for the review copy.

Children’s Book Review Roundup

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau

Okay, gosh, this is just adorable. We follow Argyle Fox as he tries, tries, tries, tries again to play outside with different toys and games, only to be thwarted by the blustery wind at every turn. Bless his heart!

This is great story about not giving up and the art is absolutely precious. Definitely recommend!

The Truth About Dinosaurs by Guido Van Genechten

This is super cute and very informative! It features a chicken explaining over various pages, and via cute little photo albums, their various dinosaur ancestors. I actually didn’t know all of the dinosaurs that chickens are descended from, so it was cool to learn more! Definitely recommend!

Olive and Ginger by Xenia Mesot

This is a lovely story about a toad and cat, and how they learn to consider things from different perspectives as well as learning to think before they speak. It reminded me of older stories with fables! The water colour artwork is simply gorgeous, and I liked how the book was set up in three acts, too. Overall very sweet and worth a read!

Gilbert the Ghost by Guido Van Genechten

The artwork in this story is absolutely lovely. The cover stole my heart and I immediately wanted to read it!

I thought this was a really cool take on ghosts! They aren’t dead people, but are born and go to Ghost School and learn how to haunt people. Ghosts that have learned to shriek loud enough, and spookily enough, are then sent off to become the resident ghosts of towns.

We follow young Gilbert the ghost who doesn’t like to scare people and doesn’t have a loud ‘Boo!’ and because of this, he’s ostracised at school. The (really horribly cruel) teacher sends him off to the Abandoned Tower because of this, where he meets a cat with whom he can be himself. Soon Gilbert is confident and chilling out with his cat friend and things get better.

I thought this was super cute, but I do wish it was a little bit longer and that maybe there was some resolve to address the teacher sending Gilbert away. He was just such a jerk and I wanted someone to address it with poor sweet Gilbert. Overall though, it was definitely a cute quick read for kids!

Thank you Netgalley for the ARCS!

Book Review: The Deep Blue (2021)

The Deep Blue by Charlotte Guillain

Covering a broad expanse of topics like the Great Barrier Reef, underwater trenches and volcanos, deep sea creatures, fishes, mango trees and their filtration systems, and more, this is a highly informative book with wonderful drawings that’s great for any young reader!

Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Book Review: Usha and the Big Digger (2021)

Usha and the Big Digger by Amitha Jagannath Knight

Around the world, different cultures see different pictures in the same stars.

OH. MY. GOSH. SO. FREAKING. CUUUUUUUUUUUUUTE. Every single page of this book was just so filled with joy and dance and cartwheels and stars. The artwork in this kind of reminded me of She’s Charmed and Dangerous, a card game I played when I was really little. Which is to say that I *adored* the artwork in this.

A great book about stars and perspectives for young kids!

Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Book Review: Dancing in Thatha’s Footsteps (2021)

Dancing in Thatha’s Footsteps by Srividhya Venkat

Tapping quick adavus with his feet, shaping delicate mudras with his hands, and showing expressive bhavas with his eyes—everything about bharatanatyam filed his heart with joy.

This is a lovely story of young Varun, who is desperate to learn to dance and finds everything inspiring, but is made fun of by the girls at the dance school. His grandfather inspires him to dance and follow his dream. It’s super sweet and wholesome!

I really loved that Tamil dance terms are used throughout! It’s great learning new words. And there’s a helpful guide at the back for those looking.

I thoroughly adored this little book about acceptance and dance. Let all those who love to dance, do so!

Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Children’s Book Review: Three Lines in a Circle (2021)

Three Lines in a Circle: The Exciting Life of the Peace Symbol by Michael G. Long

[Gerald Holtom] explained that when drawing the symbol, he adopted letters from semaphore, the alphabet used by people sending messages by flags. The two lines pointing downward and to the sides came from the semaphore letter for N, and the center line represented the letter D. Placed on top of each other and enclosed in a circle, the three lines stood for “nuclear disarmament.”

I really loved this little info book about the history and use of the peace symbol. The bulk of the book is a lovely little children’s book with great, vibrant colours and pictures about how the peace symbol has been used for activist movements. Each page lauds diversity, representation and acceptance. Such a lovely overall message! At the end of the book, there’s a history section about the peace symbol with a more in-depth overview that I really enjoyed reading. Definitely recommend!

Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Children’s Book Review Roundup

The Mountain by Rebecca Gugger – Oh my gosh, the artwork in this is simply gorgeous and colourful and just so wonderful. I loved all the extra details in each page and the way the animals and their ideas of the mountain are depicted. This is such a lovely little book, definitely give it a shot! Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Burt the Beetle Doesn’t Bite! by Ashley Spires – Everything about this book was cute. It follows Burt the beetle as he tries to find out what he excels at in the bug world and how he’ll be of use. He tries out a variety of roles until he finds the perfect fit! The drawings are just absolutely adorable and the info boxes are really informative. This is a great book for teaching kids to keep trying and not give up, while broadening their knowledge of the insect world. Definitely recommend! Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

The Mole and the Hole by Brayden Kowalczuk – Oh my goodness, the artwork in this book is absolutely P R E C I O U S. I loved every single page. Poor little Mole wanting to get out of his hole, only to be thwarted by the rocks! So, so cute! Definitely recommended for little kids! Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Zombies and Electricity by Mark Weakland – If you want to get kids interested in science and electricity, and learning the ins and outs of atoms, protons, electrons and neutrons – well, add some zombies to the mix! I think this is a very clever way of using fun, colourful artwork to provide kids with an interactive, fun little introduction to science.

The Secret Garden: A Graphic Novel, adapted by Mariah Marsden, story by Frances Hodgson Burnett – I have very fond memories of The Secret Garden from my childhood. It’s one of those classics that stays with you forever. Seeing such a lovely book transformed into a graphic novel is super awesome! This one does a lovely job giving new form to a classic. I recommend both! Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

The Land Puffin by Lori Doody – This is a cute little tale about a parrot who dreams of living by the sea and, determined to do so, journeys to live by the ocean where he finds a colony of puffins. The puffins are welcoming, but Pete the parrot wants to talk more! It’s a bit light on words, but overall a very sweet story about being yourself and doing your own thing. Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Albert Einstein by Inspired Inner Genius – This is a truly wonderful little book for young kids to get a starting point on Albert Einstein and his importance to physics. It starts with Einstein at a young age and follows him through school, work, publications and the highlights of his career. The artwork was engaging and colourful, and the structure was easy to read and informative. A great book for young readers! Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

Children’s Book Review: Ruth and the Green Book (2010)

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey, Gwen Strauss

This was a great children’s book about the historical travel guide The Negro Motorist Green Book, which was written by Victor Hugo Green in 1936 to help Black travellers find friendly lodging and petrol stations while travelling through a segregated, Jim Crow USA. That things like this had to be created because people’s minds were so closed and bigoted is utterly infuriating, but this story itself is very uplifting and shows how Black families and strangers supported each other when no one else would.

A very important book for kids, and great for adults who don’t know much on the topic, too!